The Nassikas Lorentz force thruster fails the helium test

In August we carried out a helium test on version II and III of the Nassikas thruster at SuperPower Corp. in Schenectady, NY. We fixed the coil in a liquid helium dewar with its axis pointed in a horizontal direction. The dewar in turn was suspended from a ceiling beam so that it could move from side to side. Any side deflection of the dewar, due to any internally developed force, would have been measured on an electronic scale which was in mechanical contact with the wall of the dewar. More

The expanding universe model fails the test

  The expanding universe model fails the test: Towards a new cosmological paradigm P. A. LaViolette, submitted (2017) Abstract The no-evolution, static universe tired-light model and the no-evolution concordance expanding universe cosmology are compared to observational data on six cosmology tests. The tired-light model is shown to make a superior … More

Test results on the Nassikas Thruster II propulsion device

Earlier this year we had conducted a crowd funding campaign to raise money in order to conduct a test of the Nassikas thruster II propulsion device (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/superconducting-levitation-thruster#/). The coil was wound by Superpower Inc. (Schenectady, NY) in early October and tests were completed this past week at the Superpower facilities. More

Speculations on the Electrogravitic Propulsion System of the Flux Liner Spacecraft

The above drawing was made by aerospace illustrator Mark McCandlish who based his sketch on the testimony of a friend of his who witnessed several such craft in operation. On November 12, 1988 his friend had the good fortune of viewing this vehicle and two other electrogravitic craft in a restricted hanger at Norton Air Force base while attending an air show that day. The crafts were being demonstrated to a select group of people who were given special access at the show. He observed the craft silently hovering a few feet above the ground. More

The episodic influx of tin-rich cosmic dust particles during the last ice age

The episodic influx of tin-rich cosmic dust particles during the last ice age

Advances in Space Research, vol. 56, no. 11 (2015):2402-2427. Abstract This paper presents evidence of the first detection of interstellar dust in ice age polar ice. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are reported for 15 elements found in dust filtered from eight samples of Camp Century Greenland ice dating from … More